Introduction

A medical doctor by profession and one of the most illustrious writers of the Urdu speaking world, Shafiq-ur-Rahman was born on 19 March 1920. Like western Mark Twain and Stephen Leacock, Shafiq was a Pakistani

Shafiq-ur-Rahman


Professional Achievements


A medical doctor by profession and one of the most illustrious writers of the Urdu speaking world, Shafiq-ur-Rahman was born on 19 March 1920. Like western Mark Twain and Stephen Leacock, Shafiq was a Pakistani humourist and a short-story writer of Urdu language, who gave enduring pleasure to his readers.

Shafiq- ur –Rahman received his education in Bahawalpur. He completed his MBBS from King Edward Medical College, Lahore in 1942, and post-graduation in tropical medicine and public health from Edinburgh, in 1952.

Shafiq Ur Rahman began writing humorous stories during his school days. His stories were published in a literary monthly magazine Khayyam. His first book Kirneyn was completed before he joined the medical college and was published in 1938, while he was still a medical student. His unforgettable characters include Razia, Shaitaan, Hukoomat Aapa, Maqsood Ghora, Buddy, Judge Sahab, Nannha and many other girls including Sarwat, Kishore, Sa'da, Azra Aapa, Nasreen, Akhtar, Ainak etc.

Shafiq ur Rahman joined the Indian Army Medical Corps and served at different war fronts during the Second World War. After the independence of Pakistan in 1947, he joined the Pakistan Army and eventually rose to the rank of general. He also served as chairman of the Academy of Letters of Pakistan from 1980 to 1985. During his tenure, the Academy of Letters acquired a new dimension as a prominent literary institution of Pakistan.

Shafiq ur Rahman continued to write till his death in March 2000. His work added a new dimension to humour in Urdu literature. He created a world that was very real with all its joys, pains and anguish. It was an affirmation of life and of human values: empathy, compassion and respect. Even the seemingly frivolous and trivial situations had hidden meanings that probed deep into the human psyche. His language was simple, spontaneous and expressive.

Shafiq ur Rahman was awarded the Hilal-e-Imtiaz for his military and civilian services after his death on 23 March 2001. He had three sons, Attique, Kahlique and Ameen. He died on 19 March 2000 in Rawalpindi.