Introduction

A new Pakistani talent appeared in the world news because of a new way of making petrol with fossil waste tissue papers. As we all know, due to the development in industrial and transportation sectors and population explosion

Zainab Bibi


Professional Achievements


A new Pakistani talent appeared in the world news because of a new way of making petrol with fossil waste tissue papers. As we all know, due to the development in industrial and transportation sectors and population explosion the world is facing a serious energy crisis and there is a need to find out the alternative techniques.

Ethanol is a renewable energy resource derived from the domestic resources like the waste tissue paper, corn, wheat straw, algae, food and newspaper waste mixture and also from paper waste. One Pakistani student has stunned everybody, not only in Pakistan, but also the whole world for amazing innovation by making Petrol with tissue paper. Obviously, a good news for Pakistan, because country has seen a lot of petrol crises.

Hailing from Mughalpura Lahore, Zainab Bibi, a student of M.Phil, at University of engineering and technology, Lahore has made an incredible invention by converting waste material paper tissue into bio ethanol. Zainab believes that it is possible to make large quantity of petrol for commercial purposes. She is praised from different organization of USA and Pakistan for her brilliant invention.

Zainab Bibi is among the 60 young people from across the Commonwealth who are being recognised as exceptional leaders in their community and will receive prestigious Queen’s Young Leaders Award. She is the first Pakistani female to win the award for her work and research in turning utilised tissue papers into bio-diesel. Her outstanding work and efforts for the environment is a source of pride for the nation that is viewed to suppress women in the society.

The award, which will be presented in London by the Queen in 2016, and is part of The Queen’s Young Leaders Programme, celebrates the achievements of young people who are taking the lead to transform the lives of others and make a lasting difference in their communities.

The award winners, aged between 18 and 29, who come from all over the Commonwealth, and are working to support others, raise awareness and inspire change on a variety of different issues like education, climate change, gender equality, mental health and disability equality.